Offside Rule When Goalkeper Is Out

How Does The Offside Rule Apply When The Goalkeeper Is Out?

Last updated on August 28th, 2021

The offside rule is something that can be really confusing.

You may wonder, how does the offside rule apply when the goalkeeper comes out to defend the goal?

Here’s an in-depth explanation over this issue:

How does the offside rule apply when the goalkeeper is out?

So long as the attacker is in line with or behind the second last opponent, he is in an onside position. If the goalkeeper runs out and 2 of his teammates behind him, his position does not affect the offside rule.

You are in an offside position if you are ahead of the second-last opponent

According to the Laws of the Game, a player is in an offside position if:

  • any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and
  • any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent
  • The hands and arms of all players, including the goalkeepers, are not considered.

The rules here only mentioned ‘second-last opponent‘. It did not make a distinction between a player and the goalkeeper.

As such, the goalkeeper may not actually be one of the last 2 opponents, depending on his position relative to his teammates. If he is further up the field than 2 of his teammates, his position will not be considered in the offside rule.

However, if you are past the last defender but are behind the ball, you will actually still be onside!

The goalkeeper is usually the player that is furthest back

Usually, the goalkeeper will be the player that is the furthest back of any of his teammates. When the offside line is drawn, the last defender will be taken as the reference point for the offside line.

Let’s take this example of 3 players on the pitch, with the goalkeeper being ‘1’.

The goalkeeper is the player that is furthest back. As such, the offside line will be referenced to the last defender (number ‘2’).

However, number ‘2’ is only considered as the last defender. He is actually the second last opponent since the goalkeeper is behind him!

The goalkeeper is not counted as the last 2 opponents when he rushes out

However when the goalkeeper rushes out, it may be possible that 2 of his teammates are behind him.

Using the same example, let’s say that ‘1’ is the goalkeeper and he rushes out to defend the ball.

As such, the goalkeeper is no longer considered to be one of the last 2 opponents. Both of his teammates will be considered as the last 2 opponents.

In this case, player ‘3’ will be taken as the reference for the offside line.

Player ‘3’ is not the last defender. However in this case, he is the second last opponent. This is why he is the point of reference for the offside line.

If you are in line with player 3, you will still be in an onside position. It no longer matters where the goalkeeper is, since he is no longer the last 2 opponents!

The goalkeeper may be in the other half during a late corner kick as well. However, if there are 2 of his teammates that are further back than him, his position will not matter!

Here is a further explanation done for this rule:

Does the goalkeeper count in the offside rule?

The goalkeeper is usually included in the offside rule since he should be the player that is furthest behind. However, if there are 2 other players from the same team who are behind the goalkeeper, the position of the goalkeeper will not be taken into consideration when determining if a player is offside.

Is it offside if the player is behind the goalkeeper?

If the goalkeeper is the second-last opponent and you are behind him, you will be deemed as offside. However if there are 2 players behind the goalkeeper, you will only be offside if you are ahead of the second-last opponent.

Carlos Vela vs South Africa (2010 World Cup)

One of the more famous incidents was when Mexico played South Africa in the 2010 World Cup.

During a corner kick, the South African goalkeeper came off his line. One of his defenders was still at the goal-line.

The ball was headed to Carlos Vela, who scored the tap-in. However, the goal was ruled offside!

Why is this so?

When the goalkeeper came out, he was the second-last opponent. As such, the offside line is now with reference to the goalkeeper’s position.

Since Vela was ahead of the goalkeeper, he was in an offside position. This is why the goal was ruled out!

One way you can visualise it better is by swapping the defender on the line with the goalkeeper. Since Vela was ahead of the defender, he is in an offside position!

Here is a further explanation of why this goal was ruled offside:

Assistant referees always take reference to the second-last opponents

Assistant referees have one of the hardest jobs in making the offside calls. They will tend to keep in line with the second-last opponent to make the call.

As such, the second-last opponent is always used as the point of reference for the offside line!

Conclusion

The offside line is referenced to the second-last opponent of the defending team. It does not matter whether the goalkeeper is one of these players or not.

If the goalkeeper comes out of his goal, he may no longer be one of the last 2 opponents. In this case, it does not matter where the goalkeeper is.

This is because only the positions of the last 2 opponents matter!

So long as you are in line with the second last opponent, you will still be in an onside position!

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